Monday, April 2, 2012

Syllabus


HST 203:  US History (1898 to Present)
Spring 2012
Classroom:  Towler 310
T, Th 10:30 AM – 11:45 AM

Instructor:                   Patrick Kane 
(503) 338-2473

Office:                         Adjunct Offices 1st Floor
Office Hours:              T, Th 11:50 – 12:50
Other hours by appointment

Aim and Objective of the Course:
1.         Provide students with an overview of social, political, economic and cultural changes in American History from the 1898 to Present.     
2.         Enable students to discover patterns of historical causation and change while studying diverse cultures and bodies politic.
3.         Analyze significant primary historical writings and engage in critical thinking and writing about sources and interpretations of history.
4.         Understand the basics of historical writing as it applies to the various textual course materials.
5.         Provide students opportunities for analysis through class interaction.
REQUIRED TEXTS:
Eric Foner, Give Me Liberty! An American History (Norton, 2nd edition)
Recommended and on Reserve: 
Robert D. Johnston, The Radical Middle Class:  Populist Democracy and the Question of Capitalism in Progressive Era Portland, Oregon.  Princeton University Press, 2003. (ON RESERVE at library)
Ardis Cameron, Looking for America: The Visual Production of Nation and People.  (Wiley-Blackwell, 2005) (ON RESERVE at CCC library circulation desk)

Class Assignments and Exams Consist of the Following
Weekly Readings and Participation in Discussion of Texts
Written Assignments: 
1)      Write a critical review of the Progressive era reform.  See assignment tab at http://us20th.blogspot.com/p/essay-assignments-and-research-links.html
2)      Undertake an individual project or join in a group project for the second half of the course on any of the topics listed.  Write a 3-4 page double-spaced interpretive summary on your topic.  Turn in a one-page proposal on your topic by the Midterm (I’ll review it and turn it back with suggestions.)  The final paper is due on Friday, June 3, 2011. 

Exams: There will be a midterm and a final exam.  The exams will include a list of key terms, concepts or persons that you should be able to identify.  These key terms will be identified during the course.  There will also be essay questions, one of which will be a preassigned takehome essay. 

Grading Procedures: Grades for the different credit options will be based on:
(a)    First Review paper 2-3 pages  (10%) Due at end of 2nd week.
(b)   Midterm Exam, including takehome essay (25%)
(c)  Final Exam, including takehome essay (25%)
(d) Class Participation (15%)
(e) Group or Individual Project paper (4-6 pages double-spaced in MLA format with Works Cited) (25%)

Note that you have the means to improve your grade by doing more work in the form of review essays or a presentation on an aspect of social, cultural, economic or political history.  (up to 5 points per additional project)
Academic Integrity
Each student in this course is expected to abide by the college’s code of academic integrity.  Any work submitted by a student in this course for academic credit will be the student's own. A student who cheats on exams or submits work that is borrowed from another individual or publication without providing a citation may face academic discipline, including lowering of grades or a failing grade. Students may by prearrangement present joint projects.
Accommodations for students with disabilities
Students with documented disabilities are entitled to reasonable accommodations.  To receive services, contact Services for Students with Disabilities, 338-2474, TDD—325-2902
 Non-Discrimination
It is the policy of Clatsop Community College that there will be no discrimination or harassment on the grounds of race, color, sex, marital status, religion, national origin, age, sexual orientation, or disability in any educational programs, activities, or employment.

COURSE OUTLINE AND ASSIGNMENTS

Week 1
4/3 – 4/5
Lecture:  Introduction – Progressivism and Socialism at the turn of the century and American radicalism in the labor movement.  Progressivism:  the Middle Class, Business and the Elite respond to the Socialist Challenge.
Reading:  Foner, Ch. 18 The Progressive Era 1900-1916
Recommended:  Johnston, Portland’s Radical Middle Class (on reserve)
Week 2
Tuesday
4/10-4/12
Lecture:  Isolationism and Internal Reform – the Mexican Revolution
Reading:  Foner Ch. 19

Week 3:
Tues.
4/17-19
Reading:  Foner Ch. 19 America and the War;  Ch. 20  Expansion and Collapse
Issues  Post-War American Foreign Policy:  Haiti, the League of Nations, Suppression of the Reds;   
First Review Essay Due on Progressives and Reform (Lewis Hine project on Child Labor or another progressive era reform topic)
Week 4
Tues 4/24-26
No class on Tuesday or Thursday this week
All Online Assignments:

First Assignment 1 (due Wed. 4/25):  Watch the Pare Lorentz 1938 documentary The River on the Tennessee Valley Authority and the building of dams and electrification projects.  

Answer and respond to the Blackboard Forum with a response to your viewing of the documentary. 
This documentary was produced and paid for by the Farm Security Administration.  What does this suggest about the role of the federal government in responding to the Depression and environmental and social crises during the 1930s?  Is documentary ever an impartial forum or is their a deliberate rhetoric and and structure to the film?  


Post your review of this film on the Blackboard discussion board.
   

Second Assignment (due Friday 4/27):

Option 1:  View the documentary film by Pare Lorentz, The Plow that Broke the Plains (1936).  This was Lorentz' first documentary film commissioned by the new Federal agency, the Farm Security Administration.  It deals with the stark reality and crisis of the drought and the so-called Dust Bowl that ravaged the Midwest during the 1930s and left many areas depleted of topsoil.  An excellent study of the Dust Bowl as an environmental, economic and social crisis of dislocation.  

Suggested reading:  Donald Worster, Dust Bowl:  The Southern Plains in the 1930s. (available from the Clatsop CC library) 

Post your review of this film on the Blackboard discussion board.

Option 2:  Review the photographic project of the Farm Security Administration (FSA) for documenting conditions in various counties.  I suggest you look at how the FSA examined and documented conditions in Clatsop County or other areas of the Northwest during the 1930s.   

Post your findings and commentary on the Blackboard discussion board. 

Main page and index (you can search this by location to find photographs of Pacific Northwest, including Clatsop County and the North Coast.


Week 5
5/1
Lecture:  The Causes of the Great Depression.  Reading:  Foner, Ch. 20
FDR and the New Deal;  the First 100 Days; Institutions and Structural Adjustments of the New Deal;  The First New Deal;  Excerpts of film:  The Grapes of Wrath, by John Ford.
Foner:  Ch. 21
Thurs. 5/10
MIDTERM EXAM ONLINE on Blackboard

Lecture/ Discussion:  Recession of 1937 and aftermath:  Grassroots Revolt, The Second New Deal
Foner, Online:   John Maynard Keynes, Letters to FDR.  Foner Ch. 21
Final Project proposal is due (1 page)
Week 6
5/8 – 5/10
Lecture:  Total War and Wars for Resources.  Truman the Bomb and the end of World War II and the beginning of the Cold War.  Cold War and the new international system; Cold War and Military Industrial Complex – Iran, Lebanon, Guatemala and interventions by stealth.  Foner, Chs. 22-23
Week 7
5/15-5/57
American cultural paradox of the 1950s.  Patriarchy, Beatniks, Rock n Roll, and nascent feminism;  Levittown, and the Organization Man
Foner:  Ch. 24
Culture in the 1950s
Week 8
5/22 – 5/24
Lecture:  From Kennedy to Johnson – Civil Rights, Popular Resistance and Vietnam – the paradox of the duality of internal and external crisis
Foner, Ch. 25

Film and discussion on the 1960s

Week 9
5/29 – 5/31

Note:  We will only have class on Tuesday 5/29.  For our normal Thursday session we will have an online assignment to be designated. 
Lecture:  From Kennedy to Johnson – Civil Rights, Popular Resistance and Vietnam – the paradox of the duality of internal and external crisis

Foner, Ch. 25

Lecture on the 1970s:  Nixon to Reagan – The End of Vietnam, Détente and the rise of the neoliberal New International Order;  OPEC and the Iranian Revolution; New Feminism and the cultural war of resistance by conservatives and the defeat of the Equal Rights Amendment.  Foner Ch. 26

Online Discussion on the 1970s to 1980s:  Reagan to Bush I – American reification after the Fall of the Soviet Union and the new multilateralism;  neoliberal internationalization of the economy and deindustrialization..  Foner Ch. 26
Week 10 
6/5-6/7
Summary on the 1990s - Clinton to Bush II:  The Politics of Ungovernability,
Waco, the Religious Right and Evangelical foreign policy;  responses to Islamist fundamentalism;   Financial Deregulation and its consequences.  Foner Ch. 27

Final Review for Exam / or Student Presentations
Cold War and the new international system; Cold War and Military Industrial Complex – Iran, Lebanon, Guatemala and interventions by stealth
Tues. 6/12
FINAL EXAM   10:00 – 11:50 AM
Resources and  Texts  - On Reserve in the Clatsop Community College Library:
Blackboard Academic Suite available online at:    http://bb3.clatsopcc.edu/



Supplemental and Suggested Readings:
John Kenneth Galbraith, The Great Crash of 1929 (1955). (On reserve)
Robert D. Johnston, The Radical Middle Class:  Populist Democracy and the Question of Capitalism in Progressive Era Portland, Oregon.  (2003)  (On Reserve)
Philip Agee and Walker Evans, Let Us Now Praise Famous Men, (1941)
John Steinbeck, The Grapes of Wrath (1939) and the film of the same title by John Ford, (1940).
Ardis Cameron, Looking for America: The Visual Production of Nation and People.  (Wiley-Blackwell, 2005) (On reserve)
Jeremy Suri Power and Protest: Global Revolution and the Rise of Détente (Harvard University Press, 2003). 

Internet Sources and Public Open Library Archives:
Writings of Jane Addams:  founder of the Hull House for homeless in Chicago
The New Deal Stage: Selections from the Federal Theater Project, 1935-1939
The Federal Theatre Project was one of five arts-related projects established during the first term of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt under the Works Progress Administration (WPA).
Voices from the Dust Bowl: The Charles L. Todd and Robert Sonkin Migrant Worker Collection
Archive of American Folk Song (now the Archive of Folk Culture, American Folklife Center).
A History of Jazz before the 1930s
Index to the National Civic Foundation Records at the New York Public Library

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